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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"


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Exdsheets: Quadruplets at Babies Hospital 




That you will be diligent, attentive and faithful in the discharge 
of the several duties of your profession, be tender and compas- 
sionate to your patients and will alwatjs treat their complaints 
according to the best of your skill and abilities for their safety 
and speedy cure . . . 

From the first Commmencement of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, May 15, 1811. 



:OLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
ALLEGE OF 
PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 




£ THE ! PRESBYTERlAN-HOSPITAL 

^TL -^s IN THE CIT Y j as ~—-_ I OF NEW] YORK 



i~ 




1968 



■'■' - : - 



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To 

FREDERICK G. 
HOFMANN 



A.B., University of Michigan, 
1943. - Ph.D. Harvard, 1952. - 
Markle Scholar, 1955-1960. - 
Associate Professor of Pharma- 
cology. 



A superb teacher, whose fine wit and lucid discussions brought laughter and learning to our Second 
Year. While a gentleman of the laboratory, he was able to bring what is pertinent to the clinician clearly 
to the fore. It is with pride and pleasure that the Class of 1968 dedicates its Yearbook to him. "He 1ms 
won every vote who mingles usefulness with pleasure, by delighting and instructing . . . at the same time." 
Horace. 



To 
GEORGE H. 

HUMPHREYS 



B.A., Harvard, 1925. - M.D., 
1929. — Assistant Dean, College 
of Physicians and Surgeons 1944- 
45. — Valentine Mott Professor 
of Surgery, College of Physic- 
ians and Surgeons, and Director, 
Surgical Service, Presbyterian 
Hospital, 1946-68. 




As surgeon and teacher, he is an inspiration to a generation of aspiring doctors. He has been both contri- 
butor and mentor to the field of thoracic surgery, from the time he arrived at Presbyterian Hospital as a 
young interne, when thoracotomy was done with reticence and under local anaesthesia, to the present, 
when open-heart surgery is an everyday occurrence. To us, the class of 1968, he has been the distingu- 
ished, wise and learned gentleman, who always spoke for the direct approach to problems, skillfully guid- 
ing us through logical steps to the correct solution. It is a great honor for us to dedicate the Yearbook of 
the Class of 1968 to him. 



ADMINISTRATION 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Neurology 

Chairman, Department of Neurology 

B.A., Vanderbilt, 1922 

M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1926 

M.A.(hon.), Harvard, 1942 




GEORGE A. PERERA 

Associate Dean 

Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Princeton, 1933 

M.D., Columbia, 1937 

Med.Sc.D., 1942 





MELVIN D. YAHR 

Assistant Dean 

Professor of Neurology 

B.A., New York University, 1939 

M.D:, 1943 



DOUGLAS S. DAMROSCH 

Associate Dean 

Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

B.A., Columbia, 1937 

M.D., 1940 



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Albert What's that awful smell? 



PRECLINICAL YEARS 




Melvin L. Moss And then there's the slob 
from Shaker Heights. 





Edward W. Dempsey I came, I saw, I had a heart 
attack. 




A natomy 



Richard P. Bunge She loves me, yeah, yeah, yeah. 



MADAME X 





Malcolm B. Carpenter Dammit Clwrlie, you 
made it too clear. 



George D. Pappas You mean my electromicro- 
graphs are selling well in the village? 




Charles A. Ely Someone here has lost his head. 



Charles R. Noback Nucleus Ambiguous. 






Herbert O. Elftman 
Most of the books you 
can buy aren't relevent 
to this course. 



Nancy Trotter Play- 
mate of the Month 





Wilfred M. Copenhav- 
er Yes, there is a dif- 
ference between a red 
cell and a Sertoli cell. 



How it used to be 



12 




J 



Alvix I. Krasna When I was a 
kid I used to play with tinker 
toys. 



Biochemistry 




Max A. Eisexbebg DeSilvey, is this your sample 
for the urine glucose determination? 



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Yes, Sir. 






David Nachmansohn That's N-ACH-mansohn. 



Allem M. Gold Pipetting can be fun . . . (hie) 





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David Rittenberc "A woman is only a 
woman, but a good cigar is a smoke." 



Erwin Chargaff The so-called Watson-Crick 
model. 



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David Shemix How now brown cow! 





Seymour Lieberman What makes a 
hormone? 



I tell you Gene, revolution is inevitable. 





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Martin Blank 7 put my tooi/i 
under my pillow for the good fairy. 




John V. Taggart We drew straws and I won 
Phijsiology. 



Physiology 



Shu Chien Wang That was the Year of the Gut. 



Louis T. Cizek What do you mean, 
Luigi's isn't part of the Medical Center? 



L. 







Mero Nocenti Spaghetti, Spumone, Nocenti- 
sterone 



Richard C. Mason She has honeymoon cystitis. 



Raimoxd Emmers The afferent wally 



William W. Walcott Bike-riding nude through 
Central Park, Fun City, U.S.A. 





William L. Nastuk Some peo- 
ple just EAT frogs' legs. 





Harry M. Rose Hello, you must 
be John J. Kabinkelheimerschimtz, 

Princeton '64. 



Microbiology 




Councilman Morgan 1 No, a Council- 
man body isn't 36-24-36. 



Stuart Tanenbaum "Opsonin is 
what you butter the disease germs 
ivith to make your white blood cor- 
puscles eat them'' G. B. Shaw 





Calderon Howe Andante Maestoso 





Paul D. Ellxer At ease. Clerks! 



El\tx A. Kabat She's allergic to seamen, not 
sailors. 



Gabriel C 
and truth, 


God:n 

call in 


an When you're seeking light 
the Angel Gabriel. 













X 




Herbert Rosexkraxz We cracked the DNA 
code, but it's too obscene to publish. 




Sam M. Beiser I'm just going through a phage. 




Harold W. Brown My solution? Send a scotch 
tape swab to the White House. 






Kathleen L. Hussey That's Huss-E-y. 



Parasitology 




Roger W. Williams Don't talk to me about the 
cockroaches in Presbyterian Hospital. 











M*MI% " " **- **tv*«*%! 

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Pathology 





David Spiro Angelo! Did you 
put that slide in the box? 



Donald G. McKay Haight-Ash- 
bunj, heparin and LSD. 





Joseph Wiener Whaddaya mean I forgot to 
turn on the projector during the slide quiz? 



Henry A. Aznt Don't fight 'em, join 'em. 





William A. Blanc Je n'en par/e 
jamais aux cocktails. 



David Cowen Tliank God for the telencep- 
halic niche! 





Nathan Lane Whaddaya mean, a Brooklyn ac- 
cent already? 



Raffaele Lattes Saturday morning is just 
the right time for this sort of thing. 





Philip E. Duffy We pick up where the 
diagnosticians leave off. 



Abner Wolf This will really put them to sleep! 





Pharmacology 



Brian F. Hoffman x | x _A m ^ 



f. . . T/ie Machine Age!) 



Herbert J. Bartelstone Same test 
answers. 



just new 





Donald H. Singer Just don't ask me to handle 
the digitalis anymore, Herb. 



Hsueh-Hwa Wang See, I just press this 
button and a penguin struts across the 
screen. 





Frederick G. Hofmann Fin tired of all 
the applause. Just a bravo or two would 
be nice. 




An eager student of Pharmacology. 




Lowell M. Greenbaum No, I've never digi- 
talized a penguin. 



Wilbur H. Sawyer When this puff erf ish blows up 
we'll feed it to the penguin. 




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CLINICAL YEARS 




29 



In the third year clerkship the student 
physician begins to get a feel for clinical 
medicine. 




Medicine 



Scut: from the Apache word 
scutum, 77ieaning garbage. 






George A. Perera The credibility G.A.P. 



Yale Kneeland, Jr. Stop shaking that 
x-ray at me, Bill, and tell me what 
you were able to elicit on observation 
of the patient. 





Stanley E. Bradley ft was the 
worst presentation my mother 
ever had. 




Robert F. Loeb Honor the physician 
with the honor due unto him . . . For 
the Lord hath created him. (A Proverb) 



John N. Loeb My PBI is classified in- 
formation. 



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Edgab Leifer When I went to P6-S, we were 
on every night. 



Alfred Gellhorx It's not all that bad 
to work at a non-accredited hospital. 



M. Irent: Ferrer That S-T dimpling is abso- 
lutely diagnostic of acute appendicitis. 




Kekniit Peves Trismus 





Albert W. Grokoest The second violin 
section of the Philharmonic was wiped 
out by rheumatoid arthritis. 




Henry Aranow This time try the left precordium 
for the PMI. 




Frederick Klipstein Pale, grey, soupy, fatty, 
foul and sometimes foamy . . . 



Nicholas P. Christy My beard- 
ed ladies get 20 shaves to a 
blade. 





Albert R. Lamb, Jh. I care for 2,000 people 
between 1.00 and 1.15 three days a week. 



Johx E. Ultman You mean you're still count- 
ing red cells at this hour? 





Donald F. Tapley Now, who was 
Strickman? 



Henry O. Wheeler The patient presented 
with dyspnea, hematuria, aphasia, nausea 
and jaundice and the student responded 
with tarry stools. 





Lawrence Kagen Boy Wonder 




DeWitt Goodman I used this pose during my 
audition for the Ben Casey role. 



Arthur R. Wertheim Well, no. I don't really 
think familial dysautonomia would be my 
leading diagnosis. 





|S?I^ flp? 







Courtesy. 



Sidney C. Werner, Gerard M. Tubino, David 
Rittenberg "Mirror, mirror, on the icall . . ." 



Andre Cournand 7 keep it one week 



Dickenson W. Richards . . . and I the next. 




'k- 




THE GROUP CLINIC ROUTINE 





Dana W. Atchley Don't you agree George? 



George W. Melcher Yes, Dr. Atchley. 





Charles A. Ragax Hi, I'm Charlie Ragan, 
C'mon down. 




Paul A. Marks Hugh Heffner isn't the 
only editor of a monthly magazine. 



Charles L. Christian- I'm afraid I give more pep 
to my old ladies than my medicines do. 




William V. Shaw Not me. Harold handles all 
the gonorrhea. 





, 



Paul Wermer What is the Dott syndrome? 




Richard J. Stock Well, I could give 
you one of my stock answers. 



Arnold Lisio and Kirby Cunningham 
Hi Kirby! Hi Arnie! 





Paul J. Cannon We emphasize the "P" in PSP. 





E. Carwile Leroy Damn! Only 75% of 
our patients have collagen diseases] 



David Perera And now there are three. 




Arthur I. Snyder and Charles A. Flood At 
72 cm. she gagged! 



John H. Laragh If I stand here long 
enough, maybe I'll find one. 





Hamilton Southworth The patient wants to 
go home and get some rest and then come back 
to the monitor unit. 



Frederick Bailey "He is not a whit too 
good to look after the sick, not a whit too 
highly educated— impossible! And with an 
optomistic temperament he is the very best 
product of our profession." (Osier) 





Daniel Kimberg J don't care what the 
chief says, I'll sit on the bed anyway. 




Rejaxe Harvey You know we don't ALWAYS 
find the X-rays of our patients. 



Stuart Cosgriff And now that you're on 
Coumadin, please use a safety razor. 





Elliott Osserman PEP before 
the CBC. 





George H. Humphreys, II You might call 
our program one of the oldest in existence. 



Surgery 



Milton Porter Tell us another story uncle Milt. 





Philip Wiedel Prince Philip 




Hugh Auchlvcloss Jackie who? 




David Habif For the next Surgical Carriers 
Symposium we'd better run an add in the 
Daily News 



Alfred M. Markowitz The silver fox 




12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 2> 




Ferdinand McAllister Melena! What do 
you expect if ijou hook up the descending 
aorta to the colon? 




Grant Sanger Hey Fellas— get a look at these! 




George F. Crikelair Boy, would I like to 
operate on De Gaulle's nose. 



Arthur Voorhf.es Risus sardonicus 






Surgeon Blauerund 



John B. Price, Jr. Poor daivg. 



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John Kinney ffott do 7 g< 



Shivaji B. Bhonslay I didn't want to do 100 
vasectomies a day. 





\ V 



Cushman Haagensen It's not like tuning a 
radio. 



i:# 




// 



Sven Kister One for you and one for me. 




John Prudden This is the 
Columbia transplant program. 




James Malm Our Starr — Edwards 
valves are guaranteed for a lifetime. 




Jose M. Ferrer I'm reading up on switch-blade 
surgery! 



Robert H. Wylie They didn't ask me to 
comment on that filter. 



Robert Elliott All's well in Maxwell. 





49 




Thomas V. Santulli You might just 
call it the direct approach to an indi- 
rect hernia. 



Robert B. Hiatt I'm sure glad I shaved that 
beard before the classbook photographer came 
around! 





Carl R. Feind Tapazole is the 
opiate of the masses. 



Frederic P. Herter Yes we really had to turn 
on the Herter diplomacy to get that dialysis 
unit. 



50 





DOG LAB 



Eva 7 had my operation at the Columbia Presoy- 
terian Medical Center. 





Harold Barker That's my 
answer, open him up and 
have a look. 




Raymond Amoury Watch them close- 
ly or they'll bite your finger off! 



Robert Hiatt This patient was re- 
ferred to the CPMC by an LAID who 
had to walk him six times a night. 







Pediatrics 



Douglas S. Damrosch Just try a little harder, we don't need more 
elevators. 



Well, maybe ice do. 





Edward C. Curnen Five years from now Doug, 
we will probably get new elevators. 




Robert W. Winters Thirteen Danish girls 
can't be wrong. 



Sylvia P. Griffiths and Sidney Blumenthal Imagine that Sid, some of 
the students really believe we hear all those murmurs. 





James A. Wolf Gee, 1 can't wait to go 
skiine next week-end. 



Gilbert W. Mellex My Mellen-cholic baby. 






L. Stanley James On top from down 
under. 




William A. Silverman That makes 
569,839 PKU's without a positive test. 



John F. Nicholsen There must be some 
other may to make babies! 





I Bruce Waxman and Ruth C. Harris 
Bruce, of course strep-throat demands 
a liver work-up. 




THE CYSTIC KIDS 



Hattie E. Alexander What did you 



call that drug, Ampicillin?! 




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Dean Martin Haue 7 a fascinoma 
for you — a behavior problem! 




Obstetrics 

and 
Gynecology 





n 







J. George Moore Have that answer 
on my desk by noon today. 



1 





Raymond L. Vande Wiele and Stanley 
M. Bysshe 7 tell them to try weekend in 
Vermont first — it usually works. 




Howard C. Taylor Keeping tab on America's 
mothers 



Gdlbert J. Vosburgh The class deliverer. 






Stanley M. Bysshe The market is 
down on the big board today. 



W. Duane Todd We can work it out. 




Landrum B. Shettles Circumcision is one 
procedure the obstetrician often cuts short. 





Wolfgang Tretter There's only one way to de- 
liver — Natiirlich. 



Charles M. Steer Have I told you 
the one about the farmer's daugh- 
ter? 



Karlis Adamson, Jr. and Vincent J. Freda 
There is where we clamped the cord and 
cut off the head. 



Raymond M. McCaffrey Not another med stu- 
dent's wife pregnant! 





John J. Sciarra Jack the Ripper. 




C. Paul O'Connell Grumpity, gramp, 
grump, grump — Ho, ho. 





We've got some nice lamb chops today. 




Miss McCormick The boss and the boys. 



Dean J. Grandin Every day is Mothers Day for me. 



62 




Robert E. Hall Rebel with a cause. 




Orlando J. Miller And so do his sisters and his 
cousins and his aunts. 




Ed Blumberc 



Marion Laird One of the boys. 




63 




The West Side Plaza 




Susan Williamson You say 
you're looped? 



Women in medicine — patient, nurse, doctor. 




Otolaryngology 




Daniel C. Baker 7 have found the definitive 
cure for Logorrhea. 



Jules Waltner M.D., Transylvania, 1933. 




Malcolm H. Schvey Note for a Freudian analysis of 
this common ENT problem. 






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Wilmore Neiditch Gee, why does ENT have to 
end at the neck! 



Juergen Tonndorf Just some- 
thing I picked up between 
convoys. 






Charles A. Perera Everything's perfectly all 
right madam . . . Watch out for the door. 



Robert M. Day Some call it bug eyes. 



Ophthalmology 



Anthony Donn Clean 
neat . . . tidy . . . rich 
ophthalmology! 





A. Gerard DeVoe You say we need a new men's 
room in Vanderbilt Clinic? Let's cut out the 
teaching program. 



66 





Joseph E. Salvatobe J can guarantee you $100,000 
in the first year. 

Robert E. Carroll Give me a hand! 



Charles T. Ryder We put an itsy bitsy 
prosthesis on his teensy weensy knee. 



Orthopedics 







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Alexander Garcia Hmmm . . . wonder 
how I would look in a beard. 



Frank E. Stinchfield What's a joint like this doing in a 
nice girl like you? 



C. Andrew L. Bassett I used to he 34" 



David L. Andrews It's for you . . . Honey. 






i 




WW T > 




Harrison L. McLaughlin Don't believe everything you 
read. 





S. Ashby Grantham You say the stadium 
caved in . . . Oh hoy! 



Sawnie R. Gaston And this little 
piggy ■ ■ ■ 




Charles S. Neer II Yes, you heard me correctly 
You flunked the course! 





J. Lawrence Pool Some trip! 



Neurology 



Daniel Sciarra I get the loildest reflex re- 
sponses from these nurses. 





H. Houston Merritt Columbia is going up in 
smoke. 



Carmine T. Vicale And she didn't even 
scream until we removed her fourth finger- 
nail. 



A k 




Sidney Carter Just child's play. 





Let's cerebrate! 



Melvin D. Yahr We each 
mast tend our vegetable gar- 
dens. (With apologies to Vol- 
taire) 






William B. Seaman Actually it's a 
normal hilum. 



Radiology 



Walter E. Berdon Why call it a 
horse if you can paint stripes on it? 




Ralph Schlaeger Next year I'm going to run for dorm council. 




Kent Ellis I open my eyes for the tough ones. 




David H. Baker 7 know kids inside out. 





Hans H. Zinsser Our trainees may not do too well in the OR, 
but they're ready for Channel 7. 




Archie L. Dean Oh well . 
ternity court. 



he'll never have to appear in pa- 



Meyer M. Melicow My stones are sold exclusively through 
Tiffany's. 





John K. Lattimer What good is all 
the gold in the ivorld if you can't pee 
yellow? 



Urology 



Vernon Smith As a psychiatrist you'll 
find that your kncncledge of urology 
will come in handy. 





Gabriel G. Nahas Queen Victoria took gas 
and the Empire hasn't been the same since. 



Mieczslaw Finster (captive audience) 



Anesthesiology 



Richard J. Kitz and Emanuel M. Papper 20 hours in limbo 
and 5 minutes in hell! 




Ronald Katz Yes, 1 talk them to sleep! 



I 




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Specialties 



Ray E. Trusseix There is a lot of blood and guts 
in my type of medicine! 




Carl T. Nelson Only my hairdresser knows 
for sure. 



Leonard J. Gold water Saved . 
Boards. 



. by the National 





Robert C. Darling That Dr. Murray up in 
Canada had us worrying for awhile with his 
spinal cord operation. 



75 




M 



Anthony N. Domonkos 




H. Donald Dunton I got hung up on this when 
my mother took away the pacifyer. 





Lawrence C. Kolb Some shock, 
some shrink — / just write. 



Psychiatry 



William S. Langford When all else fails, I spank 



Paul Mosher "Crock" is not a diagnosis 



Donald S. Kornfeld I've got too much common 
sense to go far in this field! 






Yes, I know these people. I grew up with them. 



Donald and Robin Bell Oh boy — the games we 
play] 



Richard Druss Good night, Boh. 



Robert Michaels Good night, Dick. 



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THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES 

I swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, and Hygeia, 
and Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that according to 
my ability and judgment I will keep this oath and this stipula- 
tion: to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me 
as my parents, to share my substance with him and relieve his 
necessities if required; to look upon his offspring as my own 
brothers and to teach them this Art, if they shall wish to learn 
it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and 
every other mode of instruction I will impart a knowledge of the 
Art to my own sons and those of my teachers, and to disciples 
bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, 
but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which 
according to my ability and judgment I consider for the benefit 
of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and 
mischievous, I will give no deadly medicine to anyone if asked, 
nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will not give 
to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with 
holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut 
persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done 
by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses 
I enter I will go into them for the benefit of the sick and will 
abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; 
and further, from the seduction of females and males, of freemen 
and slaves. Whatever, in connection with my professional prac- 
tice or not in connection with it, I see or hear in the life of men 
which ought not to be spoken of abroad, I will not divulge, as 
reckoning that all such should be kept secret. While I continue 
to keep this oath unviolated may it be granted to me to enjoy life 
and the practice of the Art, respected by all men and all times. 
But should I trespass and violate this oath may the reverse be 
my lot. 






808 




THE CLASS OF 1968 





EUGENE M. AMBARD 
Honolulu, Hawaii 
B.A., Williams 

ORTHOPEDICS 



DANIEL C. BAKER 

Demarest, New Jersey 

B.A., Columbia 

OTOLARYNGOLOGY 





NELSON L. BANKS 

Milton, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Pennsylvania 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 



JOSEPH C. BECK 

Houston, Texas 

' B.A., Rice 

MEDICINE 





ADAM N. BENDER 
Great Neck, New York 
B.A., Columbia 



NEUROLOGY 



ESTELLE P. BENDER 

New Roehelle, New York 

B.A.. Pembroke 



PSYCHIATRY 





MICHAEL D. BENDER 
Vineland, New Jersey 
B.A., Brandeis 

MEDICINE 



ROSINA O. BERRY 
Cold Sprint: Harbor. N. Y. 

B.A., Radcliffe * 

MEDICINE 





HOWARD M. BLACK 
Leonia, New Jersey 
B.A., Wesleyan 

ORTHOPEDICS 



TERRENCE F. 

BLASCHKE 

Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Denver 

MEDICINE 





ALAN C. BLAUGRUND 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 
B.A., Stanford 



EDWIN D. BLUMBERG 

Highland Park, New York 
B.A., Cornell 





CAROL H. BOSKEN 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
B.A., Oberlin 

MEDICINE 



CARLTON BOXHILL 

New York, New York 

B.A. Columbia 

MEDICINE 





THOMAS A. 
BRACKBILL 

Chatham, New Jersey 
B.A., Wesleyan 

MEDICINE 



DOUGLAS L. BRAND 

Eastford, Conn. 
B.A. Swarthmore 

MEDICINE 





HARRY L. BUSH 
Washington, D. C. 
B.A., Princeton 

SURGERY 



DAVID B, CASE 

Plainfield, New Jersey 

B.A., Princeton 

MEDICINE 





MICHAEL P. COYLE 
Hackensack, New Jersey 
B.A., .Vorre Dame 

SURCERY 



TIMOTHY H. 

CRAWFORD 

Essex, Conn. 

B.A., Trinity 

AEROSPACE MEDICINE 





JOHN" J. DALY 
New York, New York 
B.A., St. Peter's 

MEDICINE 



KENNETH H. 
DAVIDSON 

Portland. Maine 
B.A., Boston University 





DANIEL DAVIS 
New Haven, Conn. 
B.A., Wesleyan 

MEDICINE 



JOHN E. DAVIS 

Youngstown, Ohio 
B.A., Colgate 

ORTHOPEDICS 




85 




ELI G. DAYTON 

Tucson, Arizona 

B.A., University of Arizona 

PUBLIC HEALTH 



DENNIS L. DESILVEY 

East Aurora, New York 

B.A., Yale 

MEDICINE 





ROBERT A. 
DIGIACINTO 

Yonkers, New York 
B.A., Columbia 

OB-GYN 



ANDREW D. 

DOTT, III 

Huntington, New York 

B.A., Hauerford 

SURGERY 





JOSEPH C. 
DREYFUS, III 
Mount Vernon, New York 
B.A., Lehigh 

MEDICINE 



EDWARD K. DUNHAM 

Seal Harbor. Maine 

B.A., Harvard 

MEDICINE 





HENRY W. EISEXBERG 
Worcester. Massachusetts 
B.A., Brown 

SURGERY 



ALLEN D. ERICKSON 

Garden Grove. California 

B.A., Stanford 





FRANCIS G. FIDEI 
New York, New York 
B.A., Columbia 

SURGERY 



RICHARD P. FRIED 

Great Neck. New York 

B.A., Brown 

INfEDICEVE 





IAN B. FRIES 
New York, New York 
B.A., Columbia 

ORTHOPEDICS 



M. KIRBY GALE 

Camp Hill. Pennsylvania 

B.A., Princeton 

NEUROLOGY 





JOHN C. GARRETT 
Columbus, Ohio 
B.A., Michigan 

SURGERY 



KENNETH C. 
GRIFFITH 

East Aurora, New York 
B.A., Williams 

MEDICINE 





DAVID S. GULLION 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Kenyon 

MEDICINE 



Aft 



JOHN C. GUNNELL 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah 

B.A., Yale 

MEDICINE 





W. DAVID HAGER 
St. Louis, Missouri 
B.A., Wesleijan 

MEDICINE 



CLIFFORD A. HALL 

Webster. Massachusetts 
B.A., Williams 

MEDICINE 





LUCY R. HAMLIN 
New York, New York 
B.A., Wellesley 

PSYCHIATRY 



H. HUNTER 

HANDSFIELD 

Garden City, New York 

B.S., Denison 

MEDICINE 





EDWARD M. HARROW 
New York, New York 
B.A., Columbia 

MEDICINE 



JANE N. HAZARD 

Colt's Neck, New Jersey 

B.A., Wellesley 

PEDIATRICS 





STEPHEN E. HEFLER 
New York, New York 
B.A., Columbia 

PEDIATRICS 



CHARLES I. HELLER 

Fort Lee, New Jersey 
B.A., Williams 

MEDICINE 




89 




ROBERT S. JACKSON 
Chevy Chase, Maryland 
B.A., Wesleyan 

PEDIATRICS 



ANNA M. LANKESTER 

New York, New York 

B.A., Welles-ley 

MEDICINE 





CHARLES F. LEONARD 
Arcadia, California 
B.S., Cal Tech 

PSYCHIATRY 



RONALD LI 

Lake Success, New York 
B.A., Princeton 

UROLOGY' 





DOREEN P. 
LIEBESKIND 
New York, New York 
B.A., Barnard 

MEDICINE 



TIMOTHY O. LIPMAN 

Scarsdale, New York 
B.A., Harvard 

PSYCHIATRY 




90 




BARRY I. LISKOW 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
B.A., Columbia 

MEDICINE 



ANNA Y. C. LO 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Bnjn Mawr 

MEDICINE 





DOUGLAS A. 
MACLEOD 

Buffalo, New York 
B.A., Buffalo 

MEDICINE 



MICHAEL E. 
MAKOVER 

Mamaroneck, New York 
B.A., Johns Hopkins 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 





JEANETTE F. MARTIN 
Metaire, Louisiana 
B.A., Vassar 

PEDIATRICS 



TOM G. MAYER 

New York, New York 

B.A., Harvard 

ORTHOPEDICS 





christopher j. 
McNeill 

Manchester, Connecticut 
B.S., Trinity College 

MEDICINE 



RICHARD MILSTEN 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 
B.A., Yale 

MEDICINE 




• X" I | I 



JEROME L. MISSEL 
Streator, Illinois 
B.A., Princeton 



PSYCHIATRY 



EDWARD M. 

MULLIN, JR. 

Massapequa Park, N. Y. 

B.A., Hohj Cross 





WILLIAM B. MUNIER 

Corning, New York 
B.A., Pennsylvania 

ORTHOPEDICS 



DAVID R. MUSHER 

New York, New York 

B.A., Harvard 

MEDICINE 





FAYE C. NATENBLUT 
New York, New York 
B.A., Pennsylvania 

NEUROLOGY 



DAVID A. NEWSOME 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

B.A., Duke 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 





ROBERT H. 
NICHOLSON 

Moorestown, New Jersey 
B.A., Princeton 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 



ANTHONY NOWELS 

Manasquan, New Jersey 
B.S.E.E., Princeton 

MEDICTNE 





JOHN J. O'BRIEN, JR. 
Sanrurce, Puerto Rico 
B.S., Holy Cross 

PEDIATRICS 



JAMES R. PATTERSON 

Lancester, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Pennsylvania 

MEDICTNE 




93 




LAWRENCE L. 
PELLETIER 
Meadville, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Bowdoin 

MEDICINE 



PETER B. POLATIN 

New York, New York 
B.A., Princeton 

PSYCHIATRY 





JOHN E. POSTLEY, JR. 

Titusville, New Jersey 
B.A., Yale 

MEDICINE 



JAMES N. RAMEY 

Bethesda, Maryland 

B.A., Amherst 

MEDICINE AND 
PURLIC HEALTH 





JOEL H. RASCOFF 
New York, New York 
B.A., Columbia, 
M.A., Harvard 

MEDICINE 



MURRAY A. RASKIND 

White Plains, New York 

B.A., Brown 

MEDICINE 





DAVID A. REISEN 
Maplewood, New Jersey 



B.A., Harvard 

MEDICINE 



ARTHUR N. RETTIG 

New York, New York 

B.A., Columbia 





FRANK S. RHAME 
South Laguna, California 
B.S., Cal Tech 



STANFORD A. 
ROMAN, JR. 

New York, New York 
B.A., Dartmouth 







ELLEN B. ROWNTREE 
New York, New York 
B.A., Wellesley 



PSYCHIATRY 



BRUCE E. RUBIN 

New York, New York 

B.S., C.C.N.Y. 

OB.-GYN. 





A. JOHN RUSH 
Short Hills, New Jersey 
B.A., Princeton 

MEDICINE 



KENT SALTONSTALL 

Stratham, New Hampshire 

B.A., Yale 





ANDREW E. SLABY 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
B.S., M.S., Wisconsin 

PSYCHIATRY 



PETER R. SMITH 

Yonkers, New York 

B.S., C.C.N.Y. 

MEDICINE 





ROBERT M. SNOW 

Poughkeepsie, New York 
B.A., Haverford 



PHILIP A. SORABELLA 

Newton Center, Mass. 

B.A., Tufts 

MEDICINE 





JACK W. SPITZBERG 
Tyler, Texas 
B.A., Harvard 

MEDICINE 



DONALD S. STERN 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

B.A., Harvard 

MEDICINE 





LOWELL L. STOKES 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 
B.A., Yale 

SURGERY 



PETER B. STOVELL 

Stamford, Connecticut 

B.A., Harvard 

ORTHOPEDICS 





PETER G. STRINGHAM 
Groton, New York 
B.A., Hamilton 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 




DANA L. SULLIVAN 

Bronxville, New York 

B.S., Stanford 

ANESTHESIOLOGY 




ROGER N. TOWNSEND 
Nutley, New Jersey 
B.A., Princeton 

SURGERY 



VIRGINIA 

UTERMOHLEN 

New York, New York 

B.A., Washington (St. L.) 

PEDIATRICS 





ERIC J. VANDERBUSH 
Edgerton, Minnesota 
B.A., Saint Olaf 



JEREMY P. WALETZKY 

Princeton, New Jersey 

BA., Yale 



PSYCHIATRY 





L. FISKE WARREN 
Greens Farms, Conn. 
BA., Harvard 

ORTHOPEDICS 



BRUCE WAXMAN 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Trinity 

ORTHOPEDICS 



98 





LEON A. WEISBERG 
New York, New York 
B.A., Yale 



GAIL D. S. WILLIAMS 

Dobbs Ferry, New York 

B.A., Wellesley 

PEDIATRICS 





IRWIN ZAREMBOK 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 
B.A., Dartmouth 



RADIOLOGY 




- 



ROBERT G. ZIEGLER 

Vallev Stream, New York 

B.A., Hofstra 

PSYCHIATRY 



"** 





PETER ZORACH 
New York, New York 
B.A., Harvard 



MEDICTXE 



INTERNSHIPS 



Eugene M. Ambard Mixed Surgical 
Queens Hospital 
Honolulu, Hawaii 

Daniel C. Baker Rotating 

San Francisco General Hospital 
San Francisco, California 

Nelson L. Banks Rotating 

Mount Zion Hospital 
San Francisco, California 

Joseph C. Beck Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Adam N. Bender Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Estelle P. Bender Mixed Medicine 
Montefiore Hospital 
New York, New York 

Michael D. Bender Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New York 

Rosina O. Berry Medicine 

Roosevelt Hospital 
New York, New York 

Howard M. Black, Jr. Rotating 
Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 
Hanover, New Hampshire 

Terrence F. Blaschke Medicine 
University of California Hospital 
Los Angeles, California 

Alan C. Blaugrund Medicine 

Bernalillo County-Indian Hospital 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Edwin D. Blumberc Medicine 

Beth Israel Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Carol H. Bosken Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Carlton Boxhill Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Thomas A. Brackbill Medicine 
North Carolina Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

Douglas L. Brand Medicine 

North Carolina Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



David B. Case 

Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Medicine 



Ian B. Fries 

New York Hospital 

New York, New York 



Surgery 



Michael P. Coyle, Jr. Surgery 
University of California Hospitals 
San Francisco, California 

Timothy H. Crawford Rotating 
King County Hospital 
Seattle, Washington 

John J. Daly Rotating 

St. Vincent's Hospital 
New York, New York 

Kenneth H. Davidson Medicine 
Roosevelt Hospital 
New York, New York 

Daniel Davis Rotating 

King County Hospital 
Seattle, Washington 

John E. Davis Surgery 

Grady Memorial Hospital 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Eli G. Dayton Rotating 

Bernalillo County-Indian Hospital 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Dennis L. De Silvey Medicine 

Cornell University Hospitals 
New York, New York 



Robert A. DiGiacinto 
St. Vincent's Hospital 
New York, New York 



Rotating 



Andrew B. Dott, III Surgery 

U. of Washington Hospitals 
Seattle, Washington 

Joseph C. Dreyfus, III Medicine 
Cornell University Hospitals 
New York, New York 

Edward K. Dunham Medicine 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 
Hanover, New Hampshire 

Henry W. Eisenberg Surgery 

University Hospitals of Cleveland 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Allan D. Erickson 
Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New York 



Medicine 



Harry L. Bush, Jr. 
Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New York 



Surgery 



Francis G. Fidei Surgery 

Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Richard P. Fried Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital Center 
New York, New York 



M. Kirby Gale, Jr. Medicine 

North Carolina Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

John C. Garrett Surgery 

Massachusetts General Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Kenneth C. Griffith Medicine 
Hospital of the U. of Pennsylvania 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

David S. Gullion Medicine 

University of California Hospitals 
San Francisco, California 

John C. Gunnell Medicine 

San Diego County-University Hosp. 
San Diego, California 

W. David Hager Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New Y'ork 

Clifford A. Hall Medicine 

University of California Hospitals 
San Francisco, California 

Lucy R. Hamlin Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

H. Hunter Handsfdzld Medicine 
U. of Washington Hospitals 
Seattle, Washington 

Edward M. Harrow Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Jane N. Hazard Pediatrics 

Roosevelt Hospital 
New Y'ork, New York 

Stephen E. Hefler Pediatrics 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New York 

Charles I. Heller Medicine 

Beth Israel Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Robert S. Jackson Pediatrics 

University of Virginia Hospital 
Charlottesville, Virginia 

Anna M. Lankester Medicine 

University of California Hospitals 
San Francisco, California 

Charles F. Leonard Rotating 

Albany Medical Center Hospital 
Albany, New Y'ork 



Ronald Li 
Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New York 



Surgical 



100 



Doreen P. Liebeskind Medicine 
St. Luke's Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Timothy O. Lipmax 

Mixed Medicine 
St. Vincent's Hospital 
New York, New York 

Barry I. Liskow Rotating 

Bernalillo County-Indian Hospital 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



Anna Y.-C. Lo 
Greenwich Hospital 
Greenwich, Connecticut 



Rotating 



Douglas A. MacLeod Medicine 
University of Virginia Hospital 
Charlottesville, Virginia 

Michael E. Makoyer Medicine 
Jefferson Medical College Hospital 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Jea.nnette F. Martin Pediatrics 
University of California Hospital 
Los Angeles, California 

Tom G. Mayer Surgery 

L. A. County Harbor General Hosp. 
Torrance, California 

Christopher J. McNeill Medicine 
Presb\terian Hospital 
New York, New York 

Richard Milsten Rotating 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 
Hanover, New Hampshire 

Jerome Lee Missel Rotating 

Greenwich Hospital 
Greenwich, Connecticut 

Edward M. Mullin, Jr. Surgery 
Massachusetts General Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 



William B. Munter 
Roosevelt Hospital 
New Y'ork, New York 



Surgery 



David R. Musher Medicine 

Bellevue Hospital-NYU Med. Center 
New York, New Y'ork 

Fa ye C. Natanblut Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New Y'ork, New York 

David A. Newsome Medicine 

University Hospitals of Cleveland 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Robert H. Nicholson Medicine 
St. Luke's Hospital Center 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

Anthony Nowels Medicine 

University of California Hospitals 
San Francisco, California 



John J. O'Brien, Jr. Pediatrics 

University Hospitals of Cleveland 
Cleveland, Ohio 

James R. Patterson Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital Center 
New Y'ork, New York 

Law rence L. Pelletier Medicine 
University of Kansas Medical Center 
Kansas City, Kansas 

Peter B. Polatin Rotating 

Greenwich Hospital 
Greenwich, Connecticut 

John E. Postley, Jr. Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

James N. Ramey Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Joel H. Rascoff Medicine 

U. of Washington Hospitals 
Seattle, Washington 

Murray A. Raskxnd Rotating 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New Y'ork 

David A. Reisen Medicine 

Mount Sinai Hospital 
New Y'ork, New York 

Arthur Rettic Surgery 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

Frank S. Rhame Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New- Y'ork, New York 

Stanford A. Roman, Jr. Medicine 
Harlem Hospital Center 
New Y'ork, New York 

Ellen B. Rowntree Medicine 

Long Island College Hospital 
Brooklyn, New Y'ork 

Bruce E. Rubin Medicine 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 
Cooperstown, New Y'ork 

A. John Rush, Jr. Medicine 

Passavant Memorial Hospital 
Chicago, Illinois 

Kent Saltonstall Surgery 

King County Hospital 
Seattle, Washington 

Axderw E. Slaby Medicine 

Boston City Hospital 
I & III Medical Tufts Division 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Peter R. Swith Medicine 

State U. -Kings County Med. Center 
Brooklyn, New Y'ork 

Robert M. Snow Medicine 

North Carolina Memorial Hospital 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



Philip A. Sorabella Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New York 

Jack W. Spitzberc Medicine 

Stanford U. Affiliated Hospitals 
Palo Alto, California 



Donald S. Stern 
Presbyterian Hospital 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 



Medicine 



Lowell L. Stokes, Jr. Rotating 
U. of Oklahoma Hospitals 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Peter B. Stovell Surgery 

Roosevelt Hospital 
New Y'ork, New York 

Peter G. Strincham Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New York, New Y'ork 

Dana L. Sullivan Medicine 

Roosevelt Hospital 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

Roger N. Townsend Surgery 

L. A. County Harbor General Hosp. 
Torrance, California 



Virginia Utermohlen Pediatrics 
St. Luke's Hospital Center 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

Eric J. Vanderbush Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

Jeremy P. Waletzky Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

L. Fiske Warren Surgery 

Roosevelt Hospital 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

Bruce A. YVaxman Surgery 

University Hospitals Of Cleveland 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Leon A. Weisberg Medicine 

Harlem Hospital Center 
New Y'ork, New Y'ork 

Gail S. Williams Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New Y'ork 

Irwin Zarembok Medicine 

Hospital of the U. of Pennsylvania 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Robert G. Ziegler Rotating 

St. Luke's Hospital 

San Francisco, California 

Peter Zorach Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New Y'ork 



ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 




Alpha Omega Alpha is a national medical honor society 1 whose 
members are elected on the basis of scholarship and character. 
The society's motto, "To be worthy to serve the suffering," em- 
bodies the spirit of the organization. 

ELECTED MEMBERS 



May, 1967: 

Joel Rascoff, President 

Terrence F. Blaschke, Vice President 

David S. Gullion 

Doreen P. Liebeskind 

Christopher J. McNeill 

Edward M. Mullin 



November, 1967: 
Michael D. Bender 
Edwin D. Blumberg 
John J. Daly 
John Garrett 
Clifford A. Hall 
Charles Heller 
Anna M. Lankester 
Faye C. Natanblut 
Anthony Nowels 
John J. O'Brien, Jr. 
Donald S. Stern 



Faculty, November, 1967: 
C. Andrew L. Bassett 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT 




Jack W. Spitzberg 


1964-1966 


Donald S. Stern 


1966-1967 


James R. Patterson 


1967-1968 


VICE PRESIDENT and SOCIAL CHAIRMAN 




Thomas A. Brackbill 


1964-1965 


Kent Saltonstall 


1965-1967 


Michael P. Coyle, Jr. 


1967-1968 


SECRETARY 




Faye C. Natanblut 


1964-1965 


Anna M. Lankester 


1965-1966 


Jeannette F. Martin 


1966-1967 


Virginia Utermohlen 


1967-1968 


TREASURER 




John A. Rush, Jr. 


1964-1965 


Kenneth C. Griffith 


1965-1967 


Virginia Utermohlen 


1967-1968 


P & S CLUB REPRESENTATIVE 




Stephen E. Hefler 


1964-65 


Charles F. Leonard 


1965-1966 


Jack W. Spitzberg 


1966-1968 



CLASS POLL 1968 



Several months ago, if you had the all too frequent 
misfortune of waiting for the Bard Hall elevator, 
you would have noticed a cartoon by Jules Feiffer 
depicting two schoolboys discussing their parents' 
attitudes toward contemporary social issues. Both 
found their parents to be pro-drug, pro-hippie, anti- 
war, and likely to be arrested at every protest dem- 
onstration. One then commented dismally: "Fat 
chance we have of getting into medical school!" 
Between the words "into" and "medical" someone 
had scrawled "Columbia". 

Will the image of the conservative, cautious, gray- 
vested physician, religiously sitting on the right, be 
the one perpetuated by the P&S graduate of 1968? 
With this question in mind we undertook a poll to 
ascertain the social and political characteristics of 
our class. Of the 107 students polled, 69 returned 
their questionnaires, representing two thirds of the 
class. 






ft>MDS*#ft 






104 




l_n_ « mu i w 



pc* o r ~- T ■'-'-' '-"-•'-' cc ' lETH M ^ V - ,NG 



Only 100 of our original 123 class members are 
present for the final count, with the remaining seven 
of the total graduating class being later recruits. 





S 








m^mM 





Nine percent of our parents have annual incomes 
of less than $7,500, 17% are in the $7,500 to $15,000 
bracket, 39% in the $15,000 to $30,000 bracket, and 
25X take in more than $30,000. Sixty-one percent of 
the class still receives a significant portion of their 
maintenance from parental largesse. To further 
finance their education 63% of our classmates held 
part-time jobs, 58% received full or partial scholar- 
ships and 39% took out loans. 

Was there a geographic bias to our origins? It 
would seem so: the East Coast contributed a full 
80% of the class. Only 8% each came from the West 
and Midwest, with a small 4% from the South. 



* 




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ft "• 1 



as BBS 



I 



*^ 



t 



= "Ti 



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W - * 



God and Man at P&S was an infrequent twosome. 
Only 20% considered themselves active in an or- 
ganized religion, although one half did profess be- 
lief in a Deity. The remaining respondents were 
either agnostics or unbelievers. 




When P&S opened its doors to us in 1964, only 
3% sported a gold wedding band, but on leaving 
54% will, proof positive that courting and marriage 
are compatible with medical study. The popular 
notion that doctors typically marry only nurses was 
not substantiated, for only 13% have done so. 
Twenty-three percent of our mates are employed in 
education, while other occupations given were 
Russian historian, promotion copywriter, researcher, 
bacteriologist, social worker, secretary, artist, librar- 
ian, physician, attorney and IBM operator. Ten 
percent were students, of whom two were in medi- 
cine. Finally, a hard-working 8% are housewives. 






Ein Liebeskind 



68'e'rs apparently do not intend to keep their 
wives employed outside the home exclusively. 
Fifty-eight percent want 1 to 3 children, 36% want 
more than three, and 2% will leave up to the stork. 
Four percent want none, perhaps having con- 
tracted gastroenteritis during their Pediatrics rota- 
tion! 

Family programming has widespread popularity: 
76% stated they would prefer their wives to use the 
Pill as the contraceptive of choice. Twelve percent 
favored the diaphragm, and 5% found either means 
desirable. There were 6% who remained true phys- 
iologists and preferred "rhythm and chance". One 
classmate's vote went to the IUCD. Sixty-seven 
percent thought the Pill safe for prolonged use. The 
use of an oral contraceptive for males received 
57% support. One cautious respondent demanded 
to know the mechanism of action of such a pill be- 
fore he would commit himself. 





Kay ir Eric Handsficld 



Frank Fidei.Jr 




What did the average P&S student do for enter- 
tainment during his past four years? Sixty-three 
percent felt that the P&S Club played an important 
role in their extracurricular activities, especially 
during the first two years. Looking downtown, the 
poll indicated that 599c of the class attended to 3 
concerts per year, 22% 3 to 8, and the rest more than 
S. Half went to 3 to 3 plays, 30% to 3 to S, and 
20? to at least S. Only 3? attended more than 3 
musicals a year. 

Other diversions included premarital intercourse 
experienced by 73% of the class. Twenty-one per- 
cent denied this activity, one emphatically stating, 
"Heavens no! " Six percent, the more cavalier, just 
couldn't remember. 

An interesting finding was that 75% of the class 
has been to Europe. Thirty-two percent have vis- 
ited the Continent at least once, 16% twice, 13% 
three times, and the rest four times or more. One 
habitue has been over and back ten times! Once 
there, the P&S student gets around .with ease. 
Ninety-three percent of the class speaks at least one 
other language, 33% speak two, 8% three, 6% four, 
and 2% each five and six. 

Not all of us have been satisfied with contributing 
merely to the European gold drain, for 18% have 
gone to Africa, 18? to Asia, and 9? to South America. 
For less lengthy travel, one half of P&S students 
have their own cars, motorcycles or motorscooters. 






Christmas in the Tropics 



MEDICINE IN 
THE TROPICS 

As noted in the Poll, the Class of '68 is a well 
travelled group. One of the most attractive oppor 
tunities for travel offered the P&S student in the 
Fourth Year is the electivi "Medicine in tlte Tropics' 
presented by the Department of Parasitology under 
the direction of Harold W. Brown, whose ability\ 
and enthusiasm make parasitology one of the mos, 
delightful and instructive courses of our Second 
Year. But all is not parasitology in Africa, Asia and 
South America, for, as Dr. Brown puts it, "the 
elective expresses our interests in the cosmopolitain 
diseases, such as tuberculosis, syphilis, malnutrition, 
pneumonia, dysentery, cancer, cardiovascular dis- 
ease, and the host of diseases which, due to climate 
ctdture, economics, diet and race, are often very 
prevalent and severe in the tropics". On this pro 
gram, three of us have gone to Surinam, fourteer 
to three different hospitals in Liberia, two to Tax 
wan, and one each to Bolivia and Zululand. 
In addition, the elective provides the ideal oppor 
tunity to see much of the rest of the world, if com 
bined with our month's vacation. For instance, twt 
of us are skiing in the Alps in March, and skin 
diving in the Aegean in May, j'i 
addition to their stint in Liberia 
and two others are using Taiwan a 
the starting point of a voyag 
around the world! 
These glimpses of the Fireston 
Plantations Company Hospital 
Harbel, Liberia, were contribute. 
by Tim Lipman. 






It has been said that a man is known by what he 
reads, that is, if he has the opportunity to do so. 
Forty-four percent stated that they read fewer than 
5 non-medical books yearly, 31% between 5 and 10, 
and the rest over 10 books. One classmate reads a 
retina detaching 50 books per year, while another 
confessed, "None, but I sew and paint". 

Thirty percent of the class voted Time magazine 
the most popular non— medical journal, with the 
New; Yorker as runner-up polling only 10%. Playboy 
was the choice of 8%, a figure that suspiciously par- 
allels the 10% female enrollment. Other magazines 
frequently cited were the New Republic, Ram- 
parts, New York Review of Books, Newsweek, 
Foreign Affairs, and Scientific American. Two dark 
horses were Prevention and American West. The 
editors have posted a huge reward for copies of 
these subversive journals. 

The pressures of medical school have not sup- 
pressed the femininity of our fair colleagues, who . 
listed McCalTs, Home Beautiful and Vogue on 
their polls. It is because our women are able to 
maintain their femininity in a male habitat that an 
overwhelming 92% of the class voted not to decrease 
the female enrollment. 










• 



We are a class of journal readers: 24% read one 
regularly, 38? read two, 28X read three or more, and 
only 10% read none. The NEJM and Annals lead all 
other preferences, with 42% and 27% class reader- 
ship, respectively. Other journals listed included 
Ciba Symposia, AJM, Disease-a-Month, Medical 
Economics, and the Journal of Bone and Joint 
Surgery. 





% 



i.. 



On the question of drugs, drinking and smoking, 
25% stated that they had smoked marijuana. We 
hope that this does not alarm the mothers of 
America, as we are sure our pot-smokers all use the 
Strickman filter. However, only 6% of the class have 
taken "speed" and only one has taken an LSD trip. 
Seventy-five percent drink less than one-half pint of 
liquor a week, 18% about one pint, 2% between one 
and two pints, and 5% at least one quart. Despite 
the anticipated prophylaxis of the Strickman filter, 
82% of our class does not smoke cigarettes, and of 
those who do, all wish they could stop. Nine per- 
cent smoke less than one-half pack daily, 7% one 
pack, and 2% two packs or more. 

Legalization of marijuana was favored by 66% of 
the class, but only 22% were in favor of legalizing 
heroin. Sixty-one percent felt prostitution should be 
legalized, on the basis that it would stimulate the 
economy. 



i 




c ■. 




Thirty-nine percent of our classmates polled 
stated that they had visited a psychiatrist as a pa- 
tient. When asked if they had ever contemplated 
suicide, 45% stated that they had. 

Sixteen percent considered themselves racially 
prejudiced; however, only 50% would approve of 
their child entering into an inter-racial marriage. 
Three percent stated that despite their disapproval 
they would allow such a marriage. 

Politically, the class votes 39% Republican, 40% 
Democratic, and 4% Socialist. Seventeen percent 
aren't saying but may well have been among the 
70% who voted in the last election. However, po- 
litical philosophies in the class do not necessarily 
follow party registration. Liberals outnumber Con- 
servatives 56% to 15%, with 29% sitting between the 
two factions. On one issue, 42% of the class favored 
extension of Medicare to the entire population. On 
another issue only 24% of the class approved of state 
aid to parochial schools. 

The AMA has scant following among students at 
P&S despite its faithfully mailed bulletin. Eighty- 
seven percent of our class does not approve of the 
AMA medical politics, 79% feel the AMA has dam- 
aged the physician's professional image, and only 
36% would join it if no later obligations existed. 




Wjf 




f& * J? 



America's involvement in Vietnam was held to be 
morally wrong by 63% of the class. Fifteen percent 
believed in the existence of an international com- 
munist conspiracy. The late hours spent over text- 
books and charts evidently leave enough energy' for 
other acthities. Fully 37% of the class has partici- 
pated in protest marches. This approach was re- 
garded by 22% as the best means of increasing civil 
rights. Fifty-eight percent favored legislation, 40% 
favored voluntary social evolution, and 18% would 
employ civil disobedience. 

The liberal views of the Class of '68 are reflected 
in other areas as well. Eighty -two percent were in 
favor of legalized abortion, and 64% would perform 
a legal abortion on any patient so desiring. 

Should terminal patients' lives be prolonged? 
Sixty-four percent of the class said no, 16% said yes, 
and 20% felt the question was impossible to answer. 




-• ■ 



. 



How did the class feel about its four years at 
P&S? Ten percent thought the teaching was best in 
the preclinical years, while 83% favored the teaching 
the last two years. Sixty-five percent of the class ap- 
proved of the separation of basic sciences from clin- 
ical courses, but 87% felt clinical instruction should 
begin earlier than it presently does. 

Medicine was regarded by the highest number 
of the class as the department best applying its re- 
sources to teaching. Microbiology and Dermatology 
scored next highest. In a burst of 200th anniversary 
spirit, the editors refrain from mentioning class 
choices for poorest courses. May the guilt)' see the 
light and improve! 

Seventy-nine percent of the class felt that instruc- 
tion at P&S is superior to that in most other medical 
schools. Xonetheless, 60% regarded Harvard to be 
the top medical school with P&S second ("Watch 
out number one"). Eighteen percent ranked P&S 
number one. Choices for third best medical school 
ranged from Johns Hopkins (22%), Yale (15%), 
Cornell (10%), California (92), to Washington Uni- 
versity at St. Louis, Penn, Stanford, and Einstein 
each with 3%. Many felt it impossible to rank 
schools. 

Curriculum committee take note: fully 91% of the 
class desires more elective time, and none want a 
reduction. Only 9% are content with the present 
allottment. 

Should psychiatrists receive the same medical 
school training as surgeons? Forty-five percent of 
our class replied yes. 

Twenty-four percent of the class felt internships 
should be abolished. 



> • 






In the first week of school we were admonished 
not to wear "jagged, asymmetrical beards through 
the halls". Ten percent of us stated they would wear 
a mustache if approved by the Dean. Forty percent 
said no, and the remainder scratched their chins 
to see if the decision were really theirs. 

Future plans? Seventy-seven percent of the class 
plans to enter academic medicine to some extent. 

If the\' had not entered medicine, 18% of our 
class would have gone into university teaching, 16% 
into law, 10% into business management. Other al- 
ternative careers included Psychology, Architecture, 
"research", Engineering, Physics, Archeology, Gene- 
tics, Biology, History, Investments, Russian trans- 
lation. Medical Economics, Music, Art, the Minis- 
try, Carpentry, and Cabinet Making. One classmate 
answered he would be "poor", another, "unem- 
ployed", and a discontented third, "having more 
fun". 

Like father, like son? Sixty-one percent of the 
class would advise their sons to enter medicine 
(proving the existence of blind faith). Thirty-nine 
percent believed the decision should be the son's 
but that they would encourage any clearly demon- 
strable interest. 

After four arduous years, would we choose to go 
through P&S again? Seventy-five percent would do 
so ( again, proving the existence of blind faith ) . 

Will the '68 graduate of P&S find true happiness 
in Broken Jaw, Montana? Is he destined to join the 
ranks of Osier and Cushing? Will peace and tran- 
quillity continue to reign in Washington Heights? 
Look for the answers in our projected poll for 
1993! 

Bob Nicholson 
Drew Slabv 




In Old New York 



by Peter Smith 




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,f COLLEGE Of ^PHYSICIANS AND_ SUR.GEC1 

school of Medicine Columbia university 

A-D-\7b7 ' AD 192;: 




P & S Scenes 





You don't really want 20 units fresh AB neg 
stat! 

Oh yes I do Miss Sullivan! 




(OR 1885) 



Well, darling, if you want that book wc will have 
to special order it, and you know what that 
means, so, dear, are you sure now you really 
truly want it? 




^w 



Bye-Bye Bellevue 



1879 




Hello Harlem 




Club k ^ £&. 

FESTIVAL 

RAINTlNG-dLfjoTTRn^n 
SCULPTURE .--•.:• mud 
mi ART FCM 

EXPLORE HIPPER Tft£N75 
Entry form (wamble KTTe?gS«fKf 
Contest Closes Rpril |sl 



A rt Festival 



The P&S Club Art Festival was a rousing success 
since its inception in 1966 under the direction of 
Dana L. Sullivan and John Gunnell. The Class of 
'6S was an enthusiastic and artistic group, with 
First Prize in painting going to Peter Stringham 
two years in succession. First Prize in literature to 
Virginia Utermohlen, and Honorable Mention to 
Peter Smith for his fine photographs. All won First 
Prize in finger-painting, which was the highlight of 
each year's event, along with the delicious refresh- 
ments provided by our wives. 




Whoever says the city is too noisy 
For sleep at night 

Has not heard crickets 




Snowman 



These cafeteria prices! 




The good guys get the goodies. 



While quietly studying one afternoon 



Class Conservative 



Gourmets 












Dr. Zinsser! 



Muscularis 



Best dressed 





I read yal 



How much do you want to bet? 



Happiness is the new green journal. 



We tried to tell Dr. Bradley to give you an in- 
ternship here. 



Good morning Mrs. Calabash, we're your doc- 
tors. 





Bard Hall Belle 



THE COLLAGE 

OF 

MAGICIANS 

AND 

VIRGINS 



How many sweaters 
do you need to wear 
in liere? 




9 3 



■ ( 1 









\ 








P & S '68 STAFF 



Editors: 
Committee: 

Business: 

Poll: 

Photographers: 



John Gunnell 

Nina Berry 
Marilyn Gunnell 

Ed Blumberg, Manager 
Dana Sullivan 

Bob Nicholson 

Peter Smith, Chief 
Al Erickson 
Frank Bhame 



Virginia Utermohlen 
Carl Boxhill 

Ed Muffin 



Drew Slaby 

Joe Dreyfus 
Dave Gullion 



Now that our work on the 22nd edition of the 
P & S Yearbook is over, we would like to thank all 
the people who have made P & S '68 possible. First, 
our heartfelt thanks to all the faculty and P & S 
Alumni who contributed the greater part of the 
means — their overwhelming response to our appeal 
meant that we could expand the book by 16 pages. 
Then, to all our advertisers, near and far, whose 
generous support of us will be noted by all who 
may enjoy reviewing this book. To Mrs. Elizabeth 
Wilcox whose superb photographs enabled us to 



heed the admonition, "A yearbook is mainly a 
picturebook." To Roger's Studio, for making us all 
so photogenic. To Mr. Barton who mimeographed 
the circulars which were indispensable to the pro- 
duction of this book. To Mr. Emil Schmidt and 
the firm Bradbury, Sayles, O'Neill, Publishers, for 
their guidance and craftmanship. And, last, to our 
classmates and members of the staff whose talents 
and sheer hard work through the year made P & S 
'68 a delightful undertaking. 



Z hat's all Jolks! 




SPONSORS 



Dr. Karlis Adamsons 

Dr. William Amols 

Dr. Raymond A. Amoury 

Dr. Arthur J. Antenucci 

Dr. Arnold L. Bachman 

Dr. Frederick R. Bailey 

Dr. Alice T. Baker 

Dr. Daniel C. Baker, Jr. 

Dr. John M. Baldwin, Jr. 

Dr. Harold G. Barker 

Dr. Milos Basek 

Dr. and Mrs. Morris B. Bender 

Dr. Shiva ji B. Bhonslay 

Dr. William A. Blanc 

Dr. Sidney Blumenthal 

Dr. Edward T. Bowe 

Dr. Frederick O. Bowman 

Drs. S. E. and G. P. Bradley 

Dr. William A. Briscoe 

Dr. Harold W. Brown 

Dr. Gordon M. Bruce 

Dr. Vincent P. Butler 

Dr. Stanley M. Bysshe 

Dr. Charles Leigh Christian 

Dr. James W. Correll 

Dr. Stuart W. Cosgriff 

Dr. Andre Cournand 

Dr. E. C. Curnen, Jr. 

Dr. George L. Curran 

Dr. Douglas S. Damrosch 

Dr. Robert C. Darling 

Dr. Archie L. Dean, Jr. 

Dr. Felix E. Demartini 

Dr. Edward W. Dempsey 

Dr. A. G. DeVoe 

Dr. John A. Downey 

Dr. R. H. E. Elliott, Jr. 

Dr. Carl R. Feind 

Dr. Charles W. Findlay, Jr. 

Dr. Charles A. Flood 

Dr. Andrew G. Frantz 

Dr. Vincent J. Freda 



Dr. Henry Clay Frick, II Dr. 

Dr. Alexander Garcia Dr. 

Dr. Sawnie R. Gaston Dr. 

Dr. Edmund N. Goodman Dr. 

Dr. David V. Habif Dr. 

Dr. Rejane M. Harvey Dr. 

Dr. Frederick P. Herter Dr. 

Dr. Robert B. Hiatt Dr. 

Dr. Paul F. A. Hoefer Dr. 

Dr. Wdlliam A. Horwitz Dr. 

Dr. Edgar M. Housepian Dr. 

Dr. Calderon Howe Dr. 

Dr. Robert M. Hui Dr. 

Dr. George H. Humphreys, II Dr. 

Dr. Harold W. Jacox Dr. 

Dr. L. S. James Dr. 

Dr. Elvtn A. Kabat Dr. 

Dr. John Martln Kinney Dr. 

Dr. Sven Kister Dr. 

Dr. Yale Kneeland, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb Dr. 

Dr. Donald S. Kornfeld Dr. 

Dr. Albert R. Lamb, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. John H. Laragh Dr. 

Dr. John K. Lattimeh Dr. 

Dr. Edgar Leifer Dr. 

Dr. John L. Lewis, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. Ndzls L. Low Dr. 

Dr. James R. Malm Dr. 

Dr. A. M. Markowitz Dr. 

Dr. Paul A. Marks Dr. 

Dr. George W. Melcher Dr. 

Dr. Jay I. Meltzer Dr. 

Dr. Meyer M. Melicow Dr. 

Dr. George R. Merriam, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. H. Houston Merritt Dr. 

Dr. Orlando J. MnxER Dr. 

Dr. J. G. Moore Dr. 

Dr. Charles S. Neer, II Dr. 

Dr. Robert S. Neuwtrth Dr. 

Dr. Mero R. Nocenti Dr. 

Dr. C. Paul O'Connell Dr. 



Emanuel M. Papper 
Charles A. Perera 
George A. Perera 
Albert K. Plentl 
and Mrs. Phdllip Polatin 
J. Lawrence Pool 
Mo-ton R. Porter 
John F. Prudden 

Charles A. Ragan, Jr. 
Ellen F. Regan 
Dicklnson W. Richards 
Myron Roberts 
Harry M. Rose 
Saul L. Sanders 
Grant Sanger 
Thomas V. Santulli 
Dandzl Sciarra 
John J. Sciarra 
William B. Seamen 
David Sdzgal 
William Shaw 
Sheldon C. Sommers 

Hamilton Southworth 
Charles M. Steer 
Frank E. Stlnchfhcld 
Richard J. Stock 
F. C. Symonds 
John V. Taggart 
Donald F. Tapley 
Ray E. Trussell 
Raymond L. Vande Wqxe 
Carmine T. Vicale 
Jules Waltner 
S. C. Wang 
A. R. Wertheim 
Henry O. Wheeler 
Phild? D. Wiedel 
Herbert B. Wilcox, Jr. 
Susan Wdlliamson 
James N. Worcester, Jr. 
Robert H. Wyldi 
Hans Zinsser 



SANDOZ 
RESEARCH CENTER 

a new addition to Pharmaceutical Progress 




The new Sandoz Research Center is one of the most modern and best equipped research 
facilities in the nation. Here we will seek to acquire fresh knowledge in the field of 
therapeutics. 

Although much of the research will be at the "basic" level, special emphasis will be 
given to the search for compounds with potential therapeutic value. It is our expectation 
that the outcome of basic and applied research will be new drugs— the sign of steady 
progress toward directed goals. 

The Center dedicates itself to improving the future of man's health by helping to make 
the vision of a cure or treatment for every type of disease become a reality. 



■ imdcz W MM n cn rrmu , wo w . nj. ■ 




SANDOZ 



COOK HOSPITAL SUPPLY 

(Division of Kramer Surgical Stores, Inc.) 

COMPLETE EQUIPMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION 

FOR THE PHYSICIAN AND HOSPITAL 

AND 

KRAMER SCIENTIFIC CORP. 

MICROSCOPES, MICROTOMES 
LABORATORY EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

554 West 168th Street, New York, N.Y. 100-32 Tel. 212-795-6000 


WA. 3-2424 "Say It With Flowers' 

Medical Center Flower Shop 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

ARTISTIC DECORATION FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
The Flower Shop Nearest The Medical Center 

"We Telegraph Flowers" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 


RINGLER-RADOS SURGICAL CORP. 

Surgical & Medical Supplies 

"Only The Best" 

Opposite the Medical Center 

3958 Broadway WA 7-2152-3 


COURTESY CARDS 

Medical Center Pharmacy 

Jacob Kaplan, F.A.C.A. 

4013 Broadway bet. 168th and 169th in. 

WA. 3-1258 

Specialists In Prescription Compounding 


SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 Broadway, Comer 168th St. 


24 HOUR SERVICE ON COLOR 

MORRIS CAMERA SHOP 

3934 Broadway ( 165th St. ) 
Near Medical Center 

Phone LO. 8-8590 

Special Discounts fo Siudentt 


Tel. 923-9016 

TRANSIT STATIONARY 

4023 Broadway 
169- 170th Street 

Open 7 days a week. 



We speak Doctor. 
Present and Future. 



At Chemical New York, we can assist in your pres- 
ent and future personal and professional financial 
plans. With our complete range of services, we can 
meet your every banking need. 

When you first start your practice, we can help you 
with our Professional Finance Plan and a Checking 
Account. 

Later on, as your practice grows, we can help you 
with our Professional Billing Service. Or one of our 
many Personal Trust services. 

So let us help. Stop in at any of our more than 140 
offices and ask for our booklet entitled, "Professional 
Finance Plan." And find out why we're known as 
the bank that works hardest for you. 



Chemical 
NewYork 



Chemical Bank New York Trust Company Member F.D.I.C. 



137 



THE P & S ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



EXTENDS TO EACH MEMBER OF 

THE CLASS OF 1968 

ITS CONGRATULATIONS AND SINCEREST 

BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY AND 

SUCCESSFUL CAREER. 



138 



Como Pizza, Inc. 

Hot & Cold Heros 

We Deliver 4035 Broadway & 170 St. 

NICK and ANGELO 


EXPERT TAILOR & CLEANERS 
J. FRENK 

230 Fort Washington Ave. WA 7-3884 
All Kinds of Alterations 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 


Hong Lu Restaurant 

4073 Broadway, near 172 St. 

Original Chinese Food 

Take Home Orders 


A & E FURNITURE 

FINE FURNITURE & MATTRESSES 
4044 Rroadway by 170 St. LO 8-0535 


UPTOWN 
Wines & Liquor Store 

Incorporated 

4033 Broadway at 170 Street 
New York 32, New York 

LO. 8-2100 


Anthony M. Flower Shop 

Fresh Flowers Daily 
We deliver at once. Just call. 


ACME MARKET 

PRIME MEATS 

FARM FRESH POULTRY 

4049 BROADWAY 

WAdsworth 7-3236 Bet. 170th & 171st Sts. 


REME RESTAURANT 

FOOD OF DISTINCTION 

4021 Broadway, Corner 169th St. 

New York City 

Air Conditioned 


Armory Restaurant 

FINE AMERICAN-ITALIAN FOOD 

Newly Redecorated Dining Room 

401 1 Broadway bet. 168th & 169th Sts. 
Wa. 3-9034 


Center 
Home Appliance - Discount 

Television * Stereos * Air Conditioners 

Sales • Repairs on All Makes 

Special Hospital Discount SW 5-1563 

St. Nicholas Ave. & 170 St. SW 5-0828 


NELSON'S 

KOSHER DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 

CATERERS 

Home Cooked Lunches 

and Full Course Dinners 

Wines - Liquors - Cocktails Served 

4041 Broadway (Corner 170th St.) 
WA. 3-9606 


Compliments of 

Realty Hardware Co., Inc. 

1235 St. Nicholas Ave. 
Near 172 St. 




CONGRATULATIONS and BEST WISHES 

to 

THE CLASS OF 1968 

from 

The Manager and Staff of Bard Hall 



BEST WISHES 
FOR A REWARDING AND ILLUSTRIOUS CAREER 



ROGER STUDIOS 



PORTRAITS OF DISTINCTION 

4143 Broadway 

New York, New York 10033 

WA 7-7894 

WE KEEP NEGATIVES OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ON FILE 

FOR MANY YEARS AFTER GRADUATION 



WA. 7-5700 Lie. 532 

M. CITARELLA, Inc. 

WINES AND LIQUORS 
Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 BROADWAY near 164th STREET 
NEW YORK 32, N.Y. 


ONE HOUR MARTINIZING 

Free Pick-Up and Delivery 
The Most in Dry Cleaning 

4083 Broadway (172nd Street) 
WA 8-9937 


LUIGI'S RESTAURANT & BAR 

Washington Heights' Leading 

Italian Restaurants 

1148 St. Nicholas Ave. 4199 Broadwav 

167-168th Streets Corner 178th 

WA 3-9216-7 WA 8-9601 


HEIGHTS * e , 

L^amera \— enter 

The Leading Brands In Photographic 

Equipment And Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality In Photo Finishing 
Done On Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

Bet. 171st and 172nd Sts. 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

WA 3-3400 


T.I: LO. 8-1230 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

NICK TSAKIRIDIS 

4021 Broadway New York 32 
B«t. 169rh and 170th Sri. 


Pollack's Bar-B-Que 

Bar-b-que Chiclten & Ribs 

Fried chiclten, fish, shrimp, salads, dinners 

4029^ Broadway WA 8-9664 


SPOTLESS STORES, INC. 

America's Largest Cleaners & 
Launderers 

1223 St. Nicholas Ave. 


THE GOLD 
MEDAL RESTAURANT 

OUR SPECIALTY-Delicious food . . . 

moderate prices. 
Special attention to medical students. 

4019 Broadway-at 169 St. Tel. 56S-2062 



Cochrane Physicians' Supplies Inc. 



521 East 72nd Street 
New York, N. Y. 10021 



Leonard W. McHugh YUkon 8-8080 
President 



WA. 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 

JEWELER 
Electronically Tested Watch Repair 

4009 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 



SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 
Specialist In 

INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 

233 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 




143 



THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 



EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST GOOD WISHES 

to 

THE CLASS OF 1968 




BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. (U.S.A.) INC. 



Makers of 'Empirin' Compound 
And Other Fine Pharmaceuticals 



144 Printed by BRADBURY, SAYLES, CNEILL-PARAGON 






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